What to know: Trump vs Biden

Cassie Weymouth

In the wake of the Presidential transition, many Americans believe that this has been one of the most intense elections in American history– especially as Trump has yet to officially concede. However, Biden has rightfully been elected as President. Both before and during the election campaign both Trump and Biden have made their stances on controversial issues clear and have fought tooth and nail through election night and the days following.

While swing states such as Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania were crucial in Biden’s win, the most surprising were Arizona and Georgia; with the exception of Bill Clinton, Arizona has voted Republican since 1952. Like Arizona, Georgia has not voted Democrat since Clinton, nearly 30 years ago. Because of these swing states flipping, Biden won the electoral college sitting at 306. On the flip side, the loss of these crucial states caused Trump’s loss, who only won 232 electoral votes. 

Since the election, President Trump and President-elect Biden have butted heads. Trump called for recounts in Wisconsin, Georgia and Pennsylvania, while filing lawsuits against several states and counties, many of which have been dismissed. Several legal battles have also been recently thrown out all due to lack of evidence. 

During this same time, Biden has been putting together his administration, already planning how to curb COVID-19 within the first 100 days of his term. Though the positions in his administration still need Senate approval, some of his choices include Alejandro Mayorkas for Secretary of Homeland Security, Avril Haines as Director of National Intelligence, Gen. Lloyd Austin as Secretary of Defense. This will be one of the most diverse administrations, including the first Latino Secretary of Homeland Security, the first female director of National Intelligence, and the first black Secretary of Defense. 

Both Trump and Biden have been clear in their stances on policy as well.

Trump Biden
  • National Mask- Mandate: Opposed 
  • Expansion of testing: For
  • Raising the Federal Minimum Wage: Unclear but open
  • United States- Mexico- Canada trade deal: For
  • Increasing capital gains taxes: Opposed
  • Allowing the Federal Reserve to operate independent of political pressure: Opposed 
  • Abortion: Opposed
  • National Mask- Mandate: For
  • Expansion of testing: For
  • Raising the Federal Minimum Wage: For
  • United States- Mexico- Canada trade deal: For but with revisions
  • Increasing capital gains taxes: For
  • Allowing the Federal Reserve to operate independent of political pressure: For 
  • Abortion: For

    In the upcoming months, the U.S. will have a front row seat to the inauguration and coming months of a change that a new president brings.