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Sheeran’s sound proves generic

photo reproduced with permission of Breathe Heavy

photo reproduced with permission of Breathe Heavy

Alan Zhang, Staff writer

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The best word to describe Ed Sheeran’s new album is eclectic. While some are genius and others fall short, they all bring a different vibe to this ultra-popular release.

The album starts with Sheeran’s attempt to make a hip hop song in “Eraser.” But Sheeran’s attempts to rap just makes it apparent that this album is not a hip hop album. There’s no reason to listen to his rapping when there are a multitude of better artists. He later returns to rapping to no greater success in his song “Galaway Girl,” an homage to Irish folk songs.

“Eraser” is followed by one of the singles “Castle on the Hill,” and if you have listened to the radio for at least 5 minutes within the last month you’ve heard it. A powerful song about Sheeran’s younger times with his friends, this song is fast, strong and has a catchy chorus.

On the other hand, there’s “Dive,” a slower song displaying Sheeran’s range to great effect.

“Shape of You,” which is a mess of a song. The lyrics are uninspired at best, detailing Sheeran’s lust for a girl he just met at the bar. The song itself is a boring mesh of a tropical theme.

While “Perfect” returns to Sheeran’s musical roots, “Galway Girl” is a homage to Irish folk song which contains more of Ed Sheeran’s attempted rapping. The Irish folk songs are also influential in the deluxe song “Nancy Mulligan” which is a much more complete song compared to “Galway Girl.”

Sheeran follows up with a generic “Happier,” and one of the more comedic songs in the album, “New Man.” “Hearts Don’t Break Around Here” is a bland song that is just a filler in the album.

The next song, “What Do I Know” is one of the best songs on the album. The song is quicker than many of the pieces in the collection with a catchy chorus and speaks about his humble experience as just a singer. The chorus is catchy and the verses flow well.

The album is concluded with the emotional “Super Market Flowers,” which is a truly tear-jerking song about the death of Sheeran’s mother. You can feel his soul pour into the song. This song is a perfect way to close out the album.

Of the deluxe tracks that Sheeran included the only redeemable song is “Nancy Mulligan.” “Barcelona” and “Bibia Be Ye Ye” are just a mess and “Save Myself” can only be described as generic.

While the album contains some stellar songs scattered throughout, the album as a whole is generic and not as good as Sheeran’s previous albums.

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