Our mission: to enlighten and to entertain

The Griffin

Our mission: to enlighten and to entertain

The Griffin

Our mission: to enlighten and to entertain

The Griffin

March 2024: What are you reading?

March+2024%3A+What+are+you+reading%3F
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Amidst the blossoming of spring, March has proved to be a month of diverse reading preferences among Dulaney students and staff from thought-provoking to sweet, lovey-dovey reads.

Shane Bryan

Shane Bryan
Photo by: Theodossios Mavrophillipos

Freshman Shane Bryan is currently reading “Fight Club” by Chuck Palahniuk. Bryan wasn’t surprised that he saw the book in his GoodReads recommendations after finishing “Catcher in the Rye,” another modern classic, and enjoying it.

“I was drawn to it because of the plot twist which I always love in a psychological thriller,” says Shane. 

The book features an unnamed narrator who meets the book’s antagonist: Tyler Durden. Together they start an underground club where men who feel lost in society get together to fight.

“I really enjoy how Palahniuk writes as if he is talking to a friend in a joking manner,” expresses Bryan.

 

Abby Forrester

Abby Forrester
Photo by: Abby Forrester

 

Senior Abby Forrester is reading “Funny You Should Ask” by Elissa Sussman. The book is a story about a movie star, Gabe Parker, and a young reporter, Chani Horowitz, who meet for what was initially supposed to be an interview, but instead turns into an unforgettable weekend for the two.

Forrester tends to gravitate toward the romance genre because of the happy endings these books tend to have.

“I like the book so far, it’s like I’m reading my favorite rom-com,” says Forrester.

 

Davy Ling 

Davy Ling
Photo by: Nayeli Portillo

Senior Davy Ling prefers non-fiction books and tends to listen to audiobooks because they allow him to multitask and take in a lot of information while being efficient with his time. Ling is currently reading “The Book of Rites”. It was originally written between the 5th century BC and 8 AD, but Ling is reading an annotated version by Zheng Xuan. This commonly known classic of Chinese literature describes society during the Zhou dynasty. It touches on topics such as the educational system, administration, and morality.

“Oftentimes, we consider humans of antiquity to have been primitive, uneducated, and tribal, but the Book of Rites is able to show just how highly sophisticated, organized, advanced, and complex society three thousand years ago was,” says Ling.

 

Adam Sutton

Adam Sutton
Photo by: Nayeli Portillo

Social Studies teacher, Adam Sutton, has decided to read “The Identity Trap” by Yascha Mounk after one of his friends convinced him to read it. In the book, Mounk discusses recent cultural and political decisions around race and the impact they have had on our institutions. For example, Mounk believes that the recent surge in identifying ourselves by specific gender/ racial groups creates more division rather than unity.

“When someone reads something that makes them re-consider things they previously thought were true, it is immediately interesting to me,” says Sutton.

Sutton thinks that being able to discuss the hard topics the book covers with others is enlightening and finds some of Mounk’s critiques to be fair and genuine.

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About the Contributor
Nayeli Portillo, Staff Writer
Senior Nayeli Portillo is a first-year staff writer for the Dulaney Griffin. Portillo will never say no to boba or a thrifting trip, and only works to buy concert tickets and shoes. She loves Boston with all her heart and hopes to move there someday. 
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