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Classic returns for another haunting

Reproduced by permission of Orion Pictures

Anna Yan, Staff writer

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It’s been twenty-five years since the second release of “The Addams Family,” yet the story and its characters remain oddly charming.

At first glance, the Addams family is weird, maybe even borderline psychotic. The film opens with the family pouring hot water on a group of Christmas carolers.

Ouch!

Yet as the movie continues, viewers slowly discover that the Addams family is more than a creepy face. For example, they are all incredibly devoted to each other. The parents, Morticia (Anjelica Huston) and Gomez Addams (late Raul Julia) constantly shower each other with acts of affection.

That love also extends to the… well, extended family. Despite the many oddities – Cousin It, for example, is a being covered with hair – they are all incredibly accepting of each other.

Others, however, don’t care much for their particularities. Abigail Craven (Elizabeth Wilson), a loan shark, dresses her son, Gordon, as Gomez’s long lost brother in order to steal the family wealth.

Yet unexpectedly, Gordon Craven begins to appreciate the family’s weirdness. In contrast to when he couldn’t sleep during his first night back, the newly dubbed “Uncle Fester” clapped proudly when his niece and nephew sprayed blood onto the audience during their school play.

Perhaps that’s what made the movie a classic.

Of course, the humor cannot go unacknowledged. While the jokes lean toward the darker side, they are sure to crack up the audience. A personal favorite occurs as Morticia helps Gordon unpack. When she found a vial of cyanide, she raised a thin eyebrow.

“As if we’d run out,” she said calmly.

From a slow violin melody, to a lively accompaniment to the Mamushka, the juxtaposing music throughout the film helps set the mood perfectly.

And the visual effects is not to be ignored. Despite the ’90s technology, it is entirely possible to forget that a real, living, separate hand was not on set.

In a society which shuns outliers, the Addams family may be the film that assists in accepting those different from us.

Stars: 5/5

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